Local Host Sessions for 2019
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ACSP is immensely grateful to the faculty and students of Clemson University for hosting this conference and helping us create a welcoming and inclusive event. In addition to their sessions below, don't forget to consider the local host-created mobile tours on Friday!

 

Public-Private Partnerships and the Redevelopment of Downtown Greenville
Thursday, 9:45am – 11:15am

Greenville’s downtown is an outstanding example of successful redevelopment. During the 1970s, the downtown was in decline, with boarded-up buildings, vacant lots, and empty streets in the evening. Through a concerted program of visionary planning, civic leadership, public infrastructure projects, and private investment over several decades, the downtown bounced back and has evolved into the lively district of today. Specific strategies included the creation of anchors, mixed-use development, using public improvements to leverage private development, a pedestrian focus, and making the Reedy River a civic centerpiece. In this session, panelists will reflect on the decades-long process of downtown revitalization in Greenville, exploring both public and private dimensions. What are the lessons for urban planners from this compelling case study? What strategies were most successful? Can this success story be replicated in other cities and, if so, what are the essential preconditions for positive change?

Moderator: Cliff Ellis, Clemson University
Cliff Ellis originally hails from Denver, Colorado. He holds a B.A. from Colorado College where
he studied history and philosophy, a Masters of Planning and Community Development from
the University of Colorado at Denver, and a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from U.C. Berkeley. He has taught courses in both Clemson’s City and Regional Planning Program and its Real Estate Development Program on site planning, human settlement, and urban design. His research interests include New Urbanism, urban design, land use planning, history of urban form, planning history, and planning theory.

Participants:  

  • Knox White, Mayor, City of Greenville, SC 
  • Nancy Whitworth, Deputy City Manager, City of Greenville, SC 
  • Robert Hughes, Chairman, Hughes Development Corporation 
  • Barry Nocks, Clemson University 

 

Progressive Planning in a “Red” State, Session 1: Public Agencies Engaging with the LGBTQ Community and Beyond (Clemson CAAH: Voices from the Academy and the Community)
Thursday, 4:15pm – 5:30pm


Political gridlock has characterized national politics in the US for years, and is reflected in very disparate regional political and social cultures. Since 2005, when the ACSP Annual Conference was moved from South Carolina to Kansas due to debates about state support for the Confederate flag, regional differences have characterized the internal workings of ACSP, which represents a generally progressive profession working under very different political and social contexts. Debates around The State of California’s recent ban on travel to South Carolina (as well as numerous other states) illustrates a divide on how planning and progressive change occurs within different contexts. This two-session roundtable/panel explores the voices of South Carolina scholars and practitioners on how progressive planning happens in a (politically) “Red” state, and in particular how institutions and places are key components of that.

Moderator: Jim Spencer, Clemson University, Local Host Committee
James H. Spencer is Professor of City & Regional Planning and Associate Dean of the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. He is also Past-Chair of the Department of City Planning and Real Estate Development. He is originally from New York City and holds a B.A. from Amherst College, a Masters of Environmental Management from Yale University, and a Ph.D. from UCLA in Urban Planning. Prior to Clemson, he was an Associate Professor of Urban & Regional Planning and of Political Science at the University of Hawaii. He has also held staff positions at the Ford Foundation and non-profit organizations working on community development. His current research focuses on international urbanization and planning issues, with a particular focus on water supplies, infrastructure and inequality. His (2014) book titled Global Urbanization: The Global Urban Ecosystem is a part of the Rowman & Littlefield series on Globalization.

Participants:

  • Chase Glenn, Executive Director, Alliance for Full Acceptance, Charleston, SC 
  • Vince Matthews, Executive Director, Joseph H. Neal Health Collaborative, Columbia SC 
  • Ciera Durden, Associate Director for Multicultural Community Development, Clemson University, Clemson SC 
  • Natalia Rosario, Planning Director, City of Spartanburg SC 



Progressive Planning in a “Red” State, Session 2: Deep South Communities and LGBTQ Space (Clemson CAAH: Voices from the Academy and the Community)
Friday, 8:30am – 9:45am


Political gridlock has characterized national politics in the US for years, and is reflected in very disparate regional political and social cultures. Since 2005, when the ACSP Annual Conference was moved from South Carolina to Kansas due to debates about state support for the Confederate flag, regional differences have characterized the internal workings of ACSP, which represents a generally progressive profession working under very different political and social contexts. Debates around The State of California’s recent ban on travel to South Carolina (as well as numerous other states) illustrates a divide on how planning and progressive change occurs within different contexts. This two-session roundtable/panel explores the voices of South Carolina scholars and practitioners on how progressive planning happens in a (politically) “Red” state, and in particular how institutions and places are key components of that.

Moderator: Jim Spencer, Clemson University, Local Host Committee 
James H. Spencer is Professor of City & Regional Planning and Associate Dean of the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. He is also Past-Chair of the Department of City Planning and Real Estate Development. He is originally from New York City and holds a B.A. from Amherst College, a Masters of Environmental Management from Yale University, and a Ph.D. from UCLA in Urban Planning. Prior to Clemson, he was an Associate Professor of Urban & Regional Planning and of Political Science at the University of Hawaii. He has also held staff positions at the Ford Foundation and non-profit organizations working on community development. His current research focuses on international urbanization and planning issues, with a particular focus on water supplies, infrastructure and inequality. His (2014) book titled Global Urbanization: The Global Urban Ecosystem is a part of the Rowman & Littlefield series on Globalization.

Participants:

  • Todd Shaw, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC 
  • Jed Dearybury, Vice President of the Board of Directors, Uplift Outreach Center, Spartanburg SC 
  • Rachel Grothe, Associate Planner, Spartanburg SC 

 

Clemson University Local Host Session 2 – Manifesting the Swamp Rabbit Trail: The Co-evolution of Economic Development and Non-motorized Infrastructure Benefits from Environmental Remediation
Friday, 10:00am – 11:15am


Non-motorized transportation infrastructure has the potential to promote safe, efficient, integrated mobility for a variety of purposes that may include recreational and tourism opportunities, promote healthier lifestyles, and facilitate utilitarian functions (e.g., commuting). Infrastructure and related investments on combined bicycle and pedestrian trails such as the Rails-To-Trails program, have had notable local economic impacts. These merit attention from a diversity of stakeholders, including city and regional planners, real-estate developers, business and tourism ventures, local communities, and nature-oriented recreational and conservation groups. The purpose of this roundtable is to share local and national-level experiences related to implementation of non-motorized transportation infrastructure and programs, their economic and real-estate redevelopment impacts, and how the public and private sectors have collaborated (or not), strategized or leverage this type of investments in their overall city visions, development, and plans.

Moderator: Enrique Ramos, Assistant Professor, Clemson University
Enrique Ramos is an Assistant Professor in the City and Regional Program. He hails from Puerto Rico and holds B.Arch and M.Arch degrees from Tulane University, a Master of Planning degree from the University of Puerto Rico, and a Ph.D in planning from Florida State University. His doctoral dissertation examined the influence of land use and built environment factors on bus/rapid-transit network interactions in the city of Los Angeles. Before returning to the academy, Enrique’s professional career included over 15 years experience as a professional architect and land-use planner in Puerto Rico and more recently in North Florida. His main research interests focus on sustainable transportation and sustainable urban planning and design. His most recent work lies at the intersection of land-use/built-environment attributes and non-auto multimodal travel behavior including transit, walking, and biking. 

Participants:

  • Brandy Amidon, Mayor, City of Traveler’s Rest 
  • Ty Houck, Director of Greenways, Natural and Historic Resources, Greenville County Parks, Recreation & Tourism 
  • Mary Walsh, Owner, Swamp Rabbit Grocery 
  • Rob Howell & Nathan Galbreath, Developers, Hampton Station 
  • Lisa Hallo, Land Policy Director, Upstate Forever 

Mission

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning promotes education, research, service and outreach in the United States and throughout the world by seeking to:

  • recognize diverse needs and interests in planning;
  • improve and enhance the accreditation process, and;
  • strengthen the role of planning education in colleges and universities through publications, conferences, and community engagement;
  • extend planning beyond the classroom into the world of practice.

Connect

2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, D4-206 • Tallahassee, FL 32309